Posts tagged ‘supplements’

March 19, 2014

Ocean Freeze; Still a Breeze

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We are at the beach house for Spring Break this year, and it’s freezing. Ok, not freezing, but around 40-55 degrees, and NOT laying-out-in-the-sun weather. Despite the Cape Cod-like days, I’ve retreated to my daily jogs on the beach. I don’t usually do the same exercise on back-to-back days (it’s healthy to shake it up and there are so many activity options!) but somehow, being close to the water helps me loosen my grip on my rules and routine. I’ll shake it up, so I am not working the exact same muscles every day—sometimes sprint drills, other days it’s a beach boot camp routine, and some times it’s a sand jog and then Yoga. It’s tough to beat a steady-paced therapeutic run along the shoreline, but most of us can’t stop what we’re doing and run to a beachside town somewhere.

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Just sayin’

If you’re in a spot where a coastline isn’t accessible, check out these meditative, beach-like artists for your playlist:

 

  • Jimmy Buffett (duh)
  • Kenny Chesney
  • Colbie Caillat
  • Sheryl Crow
  • The Beach Boys
  • Elvis (I’m serious. Must be all of those old Elvis movies I watched.)

 Or simply search the words: top. beach. party. songs. 

Another tradition at the beach house is smoothies. Despite the cooler temps, I still made my favorites that I share below. There’s several farmer’s markets in the area, so fresh, organic produce is easy to find, and I pack my vanilla Advocare protein powder. (I also mix half a scoop of protein powder into steel cut oats with cranberries for a morning meal or snack. Yum.)

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Add some cinnamon if you want. I’m a cinna-addict!

1 cup spinach

1 cup frozen mango or peaches

1 cup freshly-juiced carrot juice (or store-bought organic carrot juice)

1/2 cup almond milk or coconut water

Shot of wheat grass

1 scoop of protein powder

 

 

ImageBlueberry Beach Babe

1 cup spinach

1/2 cup coconut water

1/2 cup kale

1 cup frozen blueberries

1/2 cup raspberry or cranberry

1 scoop protein powder (optional)

Squeeze one lemon on top and blend. Enjoy!

ImageFor you fellow Holistic hotties out there, download some Enya and take your meditation or Yoga practice to the beach at sunrise or sunset for a boost in your spiritual health walk. I’ve never felt closer to God than I do at these moments. This past trip gave me an especially relaxing session as I reflected on the Water Element. Symbolizing spirituality and wisdom, this therapeutic combination got me thinking about how the ocean is like life… or maybe it just reminds me of my life.

Read on and let me know if you can relate.

 

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  • Changes, like waves, are coming whether you want them to or not.
  • Sometimes, diving in is your best bet; then, you can start focusing on something else.
  • Let it go. It’ll drift where it’s supposed to go on its own.
  • The tide rises and falls by someone higher up than you. Why are you trying to control it?
  • The water is blue; the water is green, too. It depends on where you’re standing.
  • An overcast day at the beach is still a day at the beach.
  • It’s okay to spend some time by yourself. Some else may block your view.
  • Powdery, white sand is beautiful, until you have to run in it.
  • Protect yourself—remember the sun can burn you even if you don’t see it.
  • The ocean doesn’t belong to you, but the memories you take from it are all yours.

 Peace y’all, Lacey

 

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December 4, 2013

Keep It Moving…

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Where’s the healthy options tray?

We hosted some of my family over the Thanksgiving holiday, and although I spend majority of the year coaching clients on best nutrition and exercise practices, I enjoy sharing meals filled with holiday favorites. Everything in moderation–even candied yams.

So, how do I emerge on New Year’s Day without weight gain or illness? I supplement. Say what you want about nutritional supplementation, but America’s disease stats aren’t selling me on the whole “you can get all your nutrition from food” practice of the past.

Before Thanksgiving week, I had just completed a 30 Days to Better Health detox program. Heading into the holidays, I knew my body’s systems were functioning optimally, so I enjoyed a few of my holiday favorites throughout the weekend.

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Be sure you know what is in your supplements and how they are made.

One of my favorite (and most beneficial) supplements is fiber. Your quality of health begins and ends in the digestive tract. Furthermore, the higher the quality of input, the higher performance you’ll receive from your body’s systems. Around holiday time, I commit to a daily fiber drink that contains 10 grams of a blend of soluble and insoluble fiber. This convenient packet travels with me, can be mixed on-the-go, and tastes great at any hour. You want a mix of both types of fiber in your system, and here’s why:

            Soluble fiber. This type of fiber dissolves in water to form a gel-like material. It can help lower blood cholesterol and glucose levels. Soluble fiber is found in oats, peas, beans, apples, citrus fruits, carrots, barley and psyllium.

            Insoluble fiber. This type of fiber promotes the movement of material through your digestive system and increases stool bulk, so it can be of benefit to those who struggle with constipation or irregular stools. Whole-wheat flour, wheat bran, nuts, beans and vegetables, such as cauliflower, green beans and potatoes, are good sources of insoluble fiber.

Now I know most of you just made a mental note of certain foods listed above that you can’t eat. The reason I choose to supplement for health elements such as fiber, is because I rarely have the chance to consume high fiber foods. My life moves at a speed more conducive to nourishment on-the-go, and on those rare occasions we gather around the dinner table for a well-planned meal, most people don’t make recipes with high-fiber ingredients. Go figure.

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My advice for navigating through the holiday season? Supplement with quality fiber (and I don’t mean one mixed with a bunch of synthetic nonsense) and a probiotic for the duration to keep yourself satisfied and to keep the not-so-healthy-options (and toxic debris) moving through your digestive tract before they cause damage.

Here’s my usual morning meal during the holiday season:

Advocare’s Meal Replacement Shake (berry) mixed with Advocare’s Fiber drink (peach). Drinking this, post-workout, makes me feel like I can take on anything the day brings me.

Here are some other benefits of a high-fiber diet that nobody will discuss at the cocktail party:

            Normalizes bowel movements. Dietary fiber increases the weight and size of your stool and softens it. A bulky stool is easier to pass, decreasing your chance of constipation. If you have loose, watery stools, fiber may also help to solidify the stool because it absorbs water and adds bulk to stool.

            Helps maintain bowel health. A high-fiber diet may lower your risk of developing hemorrhoids and small pouches in your colon (diverticular disease). Some fiber is fermented in the colon. Researchers are looking at how this may play a role in preventing diseases of the colon.

            Lowers cholesterol levels. Soluble fiber found in beans, oats, flaxseed and oat bran may help lower total blood cholesterol levels by lowering low-density lipoprotein, or “bad,” cholesterol levels. Studies also have shown that fiber may have other heart-health benefits, such as reducing blood pressure and inflammation.

            Helps control blood sugar levels. In people with diabetes, fiber — particularly soluble fiber — can slow the absorption of sugar and help improve blood sugar levels. A healthy diet that includes insoluble fiber may also reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

            Aids in achieving healthy weight. High-fiber foods generally require more chewing time, which gives your body time to register when you’re no longer hungry, so you’re less likely to overeat. Also, a high-fiber diet tends to make a meal feel larger and linger longer, so you stay full for a greater amount of time. And high-fiber diets also tend to be less “energy dense,” which means they have fewer calories for the same volume of food.

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I took a separate piece of luggage to the Mrs. United States Pageant in Las Vegas for my supplemental nourishment and workout gear.

I know fiber isn’t a glamorous topic, but neither is disease, obesity, and low self-esteem. There is a way to stay on track with your health goals, and enjoy your holiday season.

A final thought for you… based on several different studies I’ve researched, the average daily fiber recommendation for adults is 35 grams for males and 25 for females. With all the processed foods and drinks out these days, a little extra wouldn’t hurt us.