Posts tagged ‘massage therapist’

July 17, 2013

Therapeutic Bodywork and Detoxification

Dry Saunas, Low-Level Laser Therapy, Stretching, Massage, Foot Soaks, Hydrotherapy, Detoxification, Herbal Cleanses… oh my!

 

EnerChi System

EnerChi System

I’d like to chat for a bit with anyone who has recently completed a fitness challenge or pushed themselves physically with any sport, activity, fitness class, or anyone who has been under extreme stress. Did I include everyone reading this? I’m here to discuss personal wellness outside of the gym—Therapeutic Bodywork and Detoxification Strategies to help you maintain a pain-free and fit lifestyle.

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Stefania Molinari-Lee, Therapeutic Massage Therapist

I’m lucky to live close to Stefania Molinari-Lee, a therapeutic massage therapist, who has helped me maintain aggressive strength endurance training the past six months. If you know me, you know I am a runner at heart, but that I recently implemented challenging “boot-camp” style workouts and strength endurance training into my physical fitness routine. I set out to change my physique, and in doing so, was reminded that my recovery time and needs changed too

The soreness and stiffness in my muscles had some to do with the aggressive training (uneven running surfaces) but also with my internal inflammation levels and stress levels. Through therapeutic bodywork, Stefania was able to re-align muscles and tendons, and relieve pressure points with built up strain.  If you’re thinking, “a massage sounds relaxing,” think again? Therapeutic bodywork isn’t the relaxing, nap-time you may be used to with your current massage therapy. You’re awake and fully-engaged with each muscle release.  Although some parts of therapy bring temporary uncomfortable pressure (depending on what’s happening in your body and to specific parts), it’s short-lived and provides a beneficial part of recovery.  Don’t fret, deep breathing gets you through everything.

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After a session, I feel like I grow two inches, and my body is ready to go again… this time operating on all cylinders and soreness/pain-free. Of course, with all of the toxic debris released during one bodywork session, you should chug-a-lug (with water) for the next 24 hours and refuel with alkaline foods.

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I’m getting better at making time for stretching, yoga, deep-breathing exercises, and detoxification foot soaks; however, now I will make time for periodic visits to Stefania for therapeutic massage therapy.

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There are many post-workout therapies to assist you with staying on you’re a-game. Aside from fueling with anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, alkaline foods, hydration, and adequate rest, consider checking out therapeutic massage therapy and foot detoxification soaks. Also, if it’s been a while since your last herbal detox, consider cleaning out your systems so you can recover effectively and continue performing your best!  –In health, Lacey

 

For more information about Therapeutic Bodywork, contact Stefania Molinari-Lee via Facebook, or check out http://pedersonchiropractic.com if you’re in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Separately, if you’re interested in other pain relief strategies, detoxification foot soaks or herbal cleansing solutions, contact me at info@laceypruett.com or via Facebook! We’ll find something that works best with your body and your goals.

 

November 16, 2012

Personal Musings of a Massage Therapist

Hello, Family and Friends! This is Brooke. For the last 4 years, I’ve been blessed to be a licensed massage therapist at a beautiful retirement community. Massage therapy itself is truly a special occupation, one that allows you to help people in so many ways. I love being able to take my fascination with science and anatomy and use it to solve problems that people have with their bodies—maybe an injury here or there, a little tweak in the back, a stiff neck and shoulders, a tension headache that needs soothing. I also confess that I like to be needed and I adore making people happy. So, therapeutic massage is a gift I can share with people.

Some people may find the practice of therapeutic touch mysterious or unfamiliar, but really, it is very simple. The manual manipulation of soft tissue not only loosens tight muscles, but also reduces pain, warms tissues, increases blood circulation and lymph flow, improves immune function, reduces blood pressure, increases respiratory capacity, calms the nervous system, and influences hormone levels (among various other things). These effects are physical, and so can be observed and measured. However, the emotional components of massage are just as powerful. Recipients of therapeutic massage report feelings of well-being and happiness, of acceptance of their body, of connection and being cared for.  Actually, some psychological benefits of massage stem from physiological means—massage can reduce cortisol, the stress hormone, and can increase serotonin, the “feel-good” hormone.  Also, massage can increase oxytocin, the bonding hormone that helps you feel nurturing connection with others. Now, I’m certainly not saying all good feelings and happiness can be explained by scientific rationalization, but in case you are the pragmatic sort, actual clinical evidence supports the benefit of therapeutic touch. There you go. Now for the more touchy-feely stuff . . .

Everyone has personal space, the invisible but palpable field of energy around them that is closely, often subconsciously regulated. One allows others into that personal space according to the social relationships he or she maintains with the others. For example, you allow your friends and loved ones close to you, but door-to-door solicitors you probably keep at a distance. When clients come to me for an appointment, they are allowing me to be in that personal space with them and share my therapeutic touch—this is a great honor. They trust that I will be professional and respectful while helping them to relax or relieve a painful knot or move more easily, and I convey my care for them through my hands and how I communicate with them. My hope for my clients by the time they leave my spa room is that we have accomplished what they asked for help with, and that they are calmer and happier than when they arrived, with looser muscles and softer spirits.

But what’s on the other side of this interaction? Most of us know what it feels like to receive a massage, but what’s your therapist thinking? I can speak only for myself, but while I try to convey a calm, peaceful, positive vibe to people I interact with, my mind is often filled with thoughts of the day feverishly pinging around like an out-of-control pinball machine.

Once a session begins, however, my monkey mind is forced to be present and connected with my client. I wrangle my thoughts and tuck them quietly away as the music provides a soundtrack to the action of my hands, and I am lulled once again into peaceful contemplation. Massage becomes a moving meditation and calms my anxious spirit, in spite of myself. Often I feel the same peace and expansiveness my client feels as we work together—we are sharing the same air and energy in the dim room after all.  As I ponder this interchange of energy, I think of this quote by Ofer Zur and Nola Nordmarken, which feels true to me: “Touch is our first language. Long before we can see an image, smell an odor, taste a flavor, or hear a sound, we experience others and ourselves through touch, our only reciprocal sense. We cannot touch another without being touched ourselves. . .”

Blessings and happy Friday!

~Brooke